Updates (research and life)

Hello there!

This blog has unfortunately been pretty inactive in the past few years (despite me wanting to go back to it), but I wanted to announce that I’m hoping to move (or copy) all of the information about Oberlin Nikkei students to their own page. Initially I had uploaded all my findings onto my personal blog for convenience, but I never thought that so many people throughout the years would find them and reach out to thank me for documenting their grandparent or an old friend/colleague. Thank you so much to everyone who has sent me a message! *If you are a relative or friend of someone who was a student at Oberlin College during the war, please email the Oberlin Alumni Association at alumni@oberlin.edu or the Alumni Magazine at alum.mag@oberlin.edu with any information or stories you’d like to share! They’d be really happy to hear from you.*

Oberlin has not contacted me about making a separate website for these students, but I’m hoping to collaborate with my brother Alex Guevara to make a separate space for these stories and photos, one that will no longer be tied to my personal blog. (I’m pretty sure there’s at least one page referenced by Wikipedia! Who did that?? In any case, this is Wikipedia’s page that references Oberlin College and the Alumni Magazine’s article on Oberlin taking in students during the war.)

In the meantime, thank you for your interest!

Here are some books that I’ve read since my time at Oberlin that have addressed (directly or indirectly) Japanese-American incarceration and internment during World War 2. If you are interested in reading some non-fiction and fictional accounts, I suggest you look these up!:

  • Farewell to Manzanar (non-fiction), Janine Wakatsuki
  • The Moved-Outers (fiction), Florence Crannell Means
  • Manzanar (photo book), Ansel Adams
  • No-No Boy, a novel by John Okada (about a young Japanese-American ostracized from his own community for refusing to go to war once the draft began)
  • The Buddha in the Attic, Julie Otsuka (her novel When the Emperor was Divine addresses the subject more directly but I haven’t gotten hold of it yet)
  • Snow Falling on Cedars (fiction), David Guterson

I REALLY wish I could go see George Takei’s musical Allegiance! It’s my dream to work on something like that!! What a fantastic combination.. historical + musical theatre! Unfortunately I’ve never been in the States when it’s been running, and there haven’t been any showings in Japan…. yet. Please go see it for me!

I also hope that in the future I can do something with my own idea for a (probably YA) novel regarding the subject. In any case, I managed to type out over 50,000 words for a draft of it for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) 2016. If you love to write or have always wanted to write, I recommend you participate in their contests! The 50,000 word draft contest is always in November, but right now they have something called “Camp NaNoWriMo”, for which writers design their own goals (word count, # of minutes, hours, pages, lines, etc.) for the month of April. I’m kind of participating, but I’ll be starting work next week after a long spring break. (I’ll be teaching English every day at three different schools!)

Another life update: I began Japanese to English translation through the website Gengo and have also done other random freelance work from tourism details to doujinshi (fan-made manga). Since I originally came to Japan wanting to use Japanese and not just teach English, I hope I can keep this up and develop my skills further- even amidst teaching at three schools.

My immediate goal, however, is to learn how to stay organized and keep track of so many different schools/classes/students! Any teachers out there with great tips?

Goodbye for now!

~Cassie

Featured in the Alumni Magazine…

So this is old news (published fall 2013, after I graduated), but I was super happy when my former advisor mailed me a copy of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine in which an article featuring some of my research was printed! Image(Took this picture right before I left for my two month spring travels- in January! My how time flies.)

You can find the online version of the article here! The article “Oberlin Vouches for Them…” was written by Lisa Chiu, who kindly interviewed me over the phone towards graduation day last year. (Perhaps it has been exactly one year since then!)

Pretty proud moment! I have started to consider presenting at the topic at my current school in Tokyo. Students at my school know about the existence of Oberlin College, but maybe they and faculty members will be interested in hearing more details about its history with Japanese-American students.

 

 

Research featured in the Oberlin Alumni Magazine

I was recently contacted by Clyde Owan, Alice Takemoto, and my father to let me know that an article by Lisa Chiu about my research has finally been published in the summer edition of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine! How exciting! I don’t own a physical copy myself (it’d be great if someone sent me one!) but my father did send me some pictures. I’m very honored to have had the opportunity to research Japanese Americans at Oberlin during WWII, and I wish I could have continued! Perhaps in the future..

For now I guess I’ll need to watch what I post on this blog, as it may gather some new alumni visitors! (Hopefully everyone can appreciate the more lighthearted posts about Japanese playlists-you-want-to-listen-to-when-your-wife-of-a-year-finally-farts-in-front-of-you.)

For a summary of my research processes click here.

To read profiles of various students at Oberlin during the war click on my “Oberlin Nisei” or “Research” tabs on the Topics sidebar.

Thanks again for reading!

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the student files I painstakingly gathered over the semester.

with Ken Grossi on my last day of the job!

with Ken Grossi on my last day of the job!

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My Research Process

First of all, I wanted to thank everyone who has taken time out to read my blog– and even subscribe to it! Thank you so much! After tomorrow I will no longer be actively researching Oberlin Nisei, as I will be graduating next Monday. Soon a new chapter of my life and my blog will begin– when I travel to Japan to teach English for two years through Oberlin Shansi. 🙂

Clyde Owan, the Obie Alum who commissioned this research project, asked me a few questions that might be interesting to all of my readers, as well as to the people who will take over my project after I graduate.

What kind of information did I collect?:

  • Full name (including spouse’s last name if necessary)
  • Date of Birth
  • Parents
  • Siblings (Any Obie siblings?)
  • Years attended Oberlin
  • Graduated? (Y/N)
  • If Nongraduate, years attended Oberlin
  • College or Conservatory? (Major?)
  • Relocated/Interned? Name of camp
  • Military Service? (Y/N + where)
  • Post-Oberlin Education
  • Post-Oberlin Occupation
  • Any significant achievements?
  • Spouse
  • Children
  • Deceased? Date

What were my sources of information?:

  • Old Oberlin yearbooks (“annuals”)
  • Student files kept in the Archives (if deceased prior to ’07)
  • Student files from the Oberlin Stewardship office (if deceased after ’07 or still living)
  • News articles (about the student or about a family member of the student)
  • Published scholarly articles (by the students)
  • Obituaries (of either the student or a family member- parent, sibling, or cousin)
  • University websites for profiles/bios (for students who became professors)

Which Nisei provided information to me?:

Alice Imamoto Takemoto and I have corresponded a few times via email. Her son, Paul K. Takemoto wrote the book Nisei Memories: My Parents Talk About the War Years.

Kenji Okuda (Oberlin Student Council President) has an extensive collection of letters that have been transcribed to the University of Washington’s website.

What key questions/issues remain unanswered?:

Many. I hoped to find more detailed information about how students lived and were treated here (at Oberlin) at the time. I found many essays written prior to admission and after graduation (usually to the alumni class or for a school or organization), but I wish I was able to find more writings that were produced while at Oberlin. The exception is Kenji Okuda’s extensive collection.

What findings inspired you?:

My absolute favorite findings were personal essays written from internment camps to the Admissions Offices.  I was inspired to read these stories of strong and optimistic young people, many of whom were forced to leave home with next to nothing, and then see many of them graduate and lead illustrious careers, marry wonderful and loving spouses, and touch the lives of so many others around them.

The decision of the Oberlin President at the time to welcome Japanese-Americans just seemed so “Oberlin”, and this research has made me even more proud to be an Obie.

(I still remember writing my essay to Oberlin College… I was studying abroad at an all girls’ school in Osaka, Japan at the time.)

Treasure Hunting

Working in the Archives and with primary resources has always been something like a treasure hunt for me. With all the digging that I do (through old files and through cyberspace) I never know what I’ll find next.

I guess I first became fascinated with this type of work when I was in middle school and nominated to take part in a great competition called National History Day, or NHD. I did it almost every year until I graduated from High School, made it to States a few times, and then won the National competition with my group for a performance about Qin Shi Huangdi, the First Emperor of China! (Obviously had difficulties getting hands on any primary sources, but we made it work somehow!)

Anyway, today I headed over to the Office of Stewardship (in the basement of Fairchild Chapel, who knew!) to pick up some student files of Nisei students who passed away after 2007. (The files of all students who passed away before 2007 are located in the Archives. Someday we’ll all have student files of ourselves– I wonder if anyone will go through mine.)

  • Mitsuko Matsuno  (Mrs. Yoshio Yanagawa)
  • Jean Mieko Moriuye (Mrs. Harold Colyer Conklin)
  • June Kitazawa (Mrs. Barr)
  • Teruko Akagi
  • Mr. Renso Y. Enkoji
  • Michiko Matsushima (Mrs. Fujimoto)
  • Margaret Yokota (Mrs. Matsunaga)

I’m especially excited to receive these files because while some Nisei became professors, scholars, charitable donors, board members of Nisei/Japanese American/Nikkei (Japanese-descent)/Veteran organizations, etc. and have been published about in articles (or obituaries), I have been unable to find much information on these seven.

More to come…